HOW TO LOOK GOOD WITHOUT MAKE UP : GOOD WITHOUT MAKE UP


How to look good without make up : Bridal make up course.



How To Look Good Without Make Up





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  • makeup: an event that is substituted for a previously cancelled event; "he missed the test and had to take a makeup"; "the two teams played a makeup one week later"

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  • Providing detailed and practical advice

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how to look good without make up - The Easy




The Easy Way to Stop Drinking


The Easy Way to Stop Drinking



Carr offers a startling new view of why we drink and how we can escape the addiction. Step by step, with devastating clarity and simplicity, he applies the Easyway™ method, dispelling all the illusions that surround the subject of drinking and that can make it almost impossible to imagine a life without alcohol. Only when we step away from all these supposed pleasures and understand how we are being duped to believe we are receiving real benefits can we begin to live our lives free from any desire or need for drinking.
The Easyway™ method centers on removing the psychological need to drink—while the drinker is still drinking. Following the Easyway™:
• You will not need willpower
• You will not feel deprived
• You will lose your fear of withdrawal pangs
• You will enjoy social occasions more
• You will be better equipped to handle stress
The Easy Way to Stop Drinking is a landmark work that offers a simple and painless solution to anyone who wants to escape from dependency on alcohol without feeling deprived.










81% (19)





Good Airplane Manners




Good Airplane Manners





Sheree and I met a flickr friend last night, Digital Agent. We spent a some time showing him a little bit of Edmonton.

So I dipped into the Larry Talbot archives and decided to post one of his Helium articles on Airplane Etiquette in honor of Digital Agent, who sounds like he spends more time in the air than on the ground. It's true I didn't consult Larry about this...but I trust to his easy going nature.

GOOD AIRPLANE MANNERS

by L. Talbot

It's important to be first in line to get on the airplane, so you can spread your belongings over the largest possible area in the overhead storage bins. You need to claim this area as quickly as possible to ensure that none of the greedy passengers get there first.

I begin establishing myself as the "most interesting person on board" by pretending to have trouble removing my backpack at the departure gate. (Security people at airports have finely developed senses of humor and enjoy a good joke.) This is a cunning strategy. This allows you to swing your backpack back and forth, at unpredictable intervals, taking out the self-centered passengers who are trying to get ahead of you.

Make copious use of your elbows if necessary and don't be afraid to "accidentally" step on your opponent's foot.

Once on the airplane, put seven pieces of gum in your mouth at the same time. Ensure you are chewing with your mouth open. Greet each (and every) passenger shuffling by you on their way to their seat by telling them loudly that you are almost over that nasty sinus condition.

Mark your territory by removing your shoes. To comply with airline regulations, place them securely under the seat in front of you. Remove your socks also and put them in the fabric bin on the seat of the passenger sitting BESIDE you. (No reason to clutter up your own magazine area, is there?) Remember that these should be socks you've worn for several days. (Savvy travelers save clean socks for when they arrive at the destination.)

As the flight attendants launch into their safety informational chat, help them out with a touch of humor. For example: when they begin describing how to put on the seat belt, ask loudly if they think you are a moron. When they announce that your seat cushion can be used as a flotation device, look around you for a particularly rotund passenger, and sniff "Like THAT'S gonna work."

Engage your seatmates in conversation. Speak very loudly so you can be heard above the pre-departure hub bub. They will be understandably interested in who you are and the many details of your life.

Insist, by the way, on calling your seatmate 'Jack,' regardless of their real name. You are then able to greet them several times, as though you have just noticed them by saying "Hi, Jack" and phrases like "Oh yeah? Well I am gonna 'Hi, Jack' you!" (Airline personnel also have keenly developed senses of humor.) You must ignore any and all of your seatmate's protestations as to their real names. Each time they correct you, turn away and say "Hi, Jack!" brightly.

At no point should you remove your gum. If it falls out of your mouth and onto your seatmate, simply pick it up again, pop it back into your mouth and continue talking.

Once the plane takes off, consider yourself free to do a little exploring. Take a walk up and down the aisle and eventually make for the bathroom.

Flight attendants really appreciate having something to do on those long flights. This is why I suggest you make the largest possible mess in the bathroom.

Experiment by flushing a broad variety of items (a handy list of these is usually posted on the inside of the door) and see if anything actually happens when you toss them into the toilet. Leave assorted towels, water and soap on the counter and under no circumstances should you put the toilet seat down.

Take as long as possible in the washroom. Ensure you unlock the door and then lock it again several times. This is great entertainment for those in line and can provide some much needed levity on an otherwise dull airplane trip.

As you leave the bathroom announce as loudly as possible "Geez! I sure feel better. I needed that!" With an air of exaggerated confidentiality, stage whisper to the next in line that they may want to "give it a few minutes" before they go in.

A few other tips you may want to consider:

1) When the meal comes, ignore your own food. Instead stare at your seatmate and repeatedly state "Gee. I should have ordered that." (This is particularly entertaining if you have both ordered the same meal.)

2) Ask your seatmate if they plan to eat "all of that" or if you can try a forkful of their peas to see if they taste the same as yours.

3) Since turnabout is fair play, offer your seatmate some of your food on your fork and ask "Does this taste funny to you?"

4) Break your plastic utensils as often as possible. Tell the flight attendants that wher











Am I a good person?




Am I a good person?





My friend Dru takes a Church member through the good person test. She thought she was a good person.

It is written in Proverbs 20:6 "Most men will proclaim every one his own goodness: but a faithful man who can find?"

It is a common practice for people to play down their sinfulness by declaring, "nobody's perfect" as if to admit that they make mistakes but overall they are good and God will find favor in their acts of kindness, giving and sacrifice.

It is written in Proverbs 14:12 "There is a way which seems right to a man, But its end is the way of death."

The Word of God alone has authority to teach us all that we need to know about what is good.

"I have not departed from the command of His lips; I have treasured the words of His mouth more than my necessary food." Job 23:12

It is written in 2 Timothy 3:16-17"All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work."

And God is the source of all knowledge and wisdom.

As it is written in Colossians 2:1-4 "For I want you to know how great a struggle I have on your behalf and for those who are at Laodicea, and for all those who have not personally seen my face, that their hearts may be encouraged, having been knit together in love, and attaining to all the wealth that comes from the full assurance of understanding, resulting in a true knowledge of God’s mystery, that is, Christ Himself, in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. I say this so that no one will delude you with persuasive argument."

And it is also written in Colossians 2:8-10 "See to it that no one takes you captive through philosophy and empty deception, according to the tradition of men, according to the elementary principles of the world, rather than according to Christ. For in Him all the fullness of Deity dwells in bodily form, and in Him you have been made complete, and He is the head over all rule and authority."

God instructs us in His Word that no one on earth does good or is good.

As it is written in Psalm 53:2-3 "God looks down from heaven on the sons of men to see if there are any who understand, any who seek God. Every one of them has turned aside; together they have become corrupt; There is no one who does good, not even one."

And it is also written in Romans 3:10-12 "...THERE IS NONE RIGHTEOUS, NOT EVEN ONE;

THERE IS NONE WHO UNDERSTANDS,
THERE IS NONE WHO SEEKS FOR GOD;

ALL HAVE TURNED ASIDE, TOGETHER THEY HAVE BECOME USELESS;
THERE IS NONE WHO DOES GOOD,
THERE IS NOT EVEN ONE.”

It is also written in Jeremiah 17:9 that "The heart is more deceitful than all else And is desperately sick; Who can understand it?"

And in Mark 10:18 Jesus said to the rich young ruler, "...Why do you call Me good? No one is good except God alone." Mark 10:18

And in Ecclesiastes 7:20 it is written, "Indeed, there is not a righteous man on earth who continually does good and who never sins."

And if we are able to be honest with ourselves it becomes clear that no matter how much we try to make up for our sins of the past we are still guilty.

As it is written in Isaiah 64:6 "For all of us have become like one who is unclean, And all our righteous deeds are like a filthy garment; And all of us wither like a leaf, And our iniquities, like the wind, take us away."

"The exercise of justice is joy for the righteous, But is terror to the workers of iniquity." Proverbs 21:15

Confessing our guilt does not exonerate us from our transgressions against God. To understand this we could imagine a person standing before an earthly judge who is guilty of a crime and there is audio/video evidence along with witness testimony. The criminal confesses their crimes and pleads guilty but the person does not go free simply because they take responsibility for their actions. A good judge will not let a criminal go free. All of the criminal's righteous acts of the past, present and future are worthless to the judge who must be just in his ruling. A good judge will not be bribed.

"For God will bring every act to judgment, everything which is hidden, whether it is good or evil." Ecclesiastes 12:14

As it is written in Nahum 1:3 that "The LORD is slow to anger and great in power, And the LORD will by no means leave the guilty unpunished. In whirlwind and storm is His way, And clouds are the dust beneath His feet."

Sin is a serious offense. No matter how minor the transgression there is an eternal consequence for every action.

As it is written in 1 Corinthians 15:56 that, "The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law."

And in Ezekiel 18:4 it is written, "Behold, all souls are Mine; the soul of the father as well as the soul of the son is Mine. The soul who sins will die.&qu









how to look good without make up








how to look good without make up




A Good Hard Look: A Novel






In Flannery O'Connor's hometown of Milledgeville, Georgia, reckless relationships lead to a tragedy that forever alters the town and the author herself.

Crippled by lupus at twenty-five, celebrated author Flannery O'Connor was forced to leave New York City and return home to Andalusia, her family farm in Milledgeville, Georgia. Years later, as Flannery is finishing a novel and tending to her menagerie of peacocks, her mother drags her to the wedding of a family friend.

Cookie Himmel embodies every facet of Southern womanhood that Flannery lacks: she is revered for her beauty and grace; she is at the helm of every ladies' organization in town; and she has returned from her time in Manhattan with a rich fiance, Melvin Whiteson. Melvin has come to Milledgeville to begin a new chapter in his life, but it is not until he meets Flannery that he starts to take a good hard look at the choices he has made. Despite the limitations of her disease, Flannery seems to be more alive than other people, and Melvin is drawn to her like a moth to a candle flame.

Melvin is not the only person in Milledgeville who starts to feel that life is passing him by. Lona Waters, the dutiful wife of a local policeman, is hired by Cookie to help create a perfect home. As Lona spends her days sewing curtains, she is given an opportunity to remember what it feels like to be truly alive, and she seizes it with both hands.

Heartbreakingly beautiful and inescapably human, these ordinary and extraordinary people chart their own courses through life. In the aftermath of one tragic afternoon, they are all forced to look at themselves and face up to Flannery's observation that the truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it."

"

In Flannery O'Connor's hometown of Milledgeville, Georgia, reckless relationships lead to a tragedy that forever alters the town and the author herself.

Crippled by lupus at twenty-five, celebrated author Flannery O'Connor was forced to leave New York City and return home to Andalusia, her family farm in Milledgeville, Georgia. Years later, as Flannery is finishing a novel and tending to her menagerie of peacocks, her mother drags her to the wedding of a family friend.

Cookie Himmel embodies every facet of Southern womanhood that Flannery lacks: she is revered for her beauty and grace; she is at the helm of every ladies' organization in town; and she has returned from her time in Manhattan with a rich fiance, Melvin Whiteson. Melvin has come to Milledgeville to begin a new chapter in his life, but it is not until he meets Flannery that he starts to take a good hard look at the choices he has made. Despite the limitations of her disease, Flannery seems to be more alive than other people, and Melvin is drawn to her like a moth to a candle flame.

Melvin is not the only person in Milledgeville who starts to feel that life is passing him by. Lona Waters, the dutiful wife of a local policeman, is hired by Cookie to help create a perfect home. As Lona spends her days sewing curtains, she is given an opportunity to remember what it feels like to be truly alive, and she seizes it with both hands.

Heartbreakingly beautiful and inescapably human, these ordinary and extraordinary people chart their own courses through life. In the aftermath of one tragic afternoon, they are all forced to look at themselves and face up to Flannery's observation that "the truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it."


Author One-on-One: Ann Napolitano and Paula McLain

In this Amazon exclusive, authors Ann Napolitano and Paula McLain (The Paris Wife) and asked them to interview each other.
Ann Napolitano
Paula McLain: Hello, Ann. First of all, I have to tell you how much I loved A Good Hard Look. I was completely drawn in by the world you’ve created, and by your heartbreakingly real characters. Can you begin by saying a little bit about where the idea for the book came from?
Ann Napolitano: Thanks so much, Paula. I’m a huge fan of The Paris Wife, so that means a lot. The novel started with one of the characters, Melvin Whiteson. I had the idea of this very wealthy man who’d been given every opportunity, but didn’t know what to do with those opportunities. I was interested in the question of how people choose to live their lives. The novel wasn’t really working though; I think Melvin was more of an idea than a character. It was about a year into the book that Flannery O’Connor showed up out of the blue--creatively speaking--though in hindsight, I can see that she embodies for me this idea of a "life well-lived." I think she provided the contrast that Melvin required to come to life as a character, and really, to shape the rest of the narrative.
Paula McLain: Have you always been a fan of Flannery O’Connor? How did you go about creating your Flannery, the fictional character?
Ann Napolitano: I had read her short stories, like every other dutiful English major. The stories blew me away, but at the same time I found them abrasive and disturbing. The violence, the strangeness--they’re pretty hardcore. For that reason, I don’t know that I ever would have re-visited Flannery if I hadn’t been assigned the collection of her letters, The Habit of Being, in my senior year. Her letters are wonderful--she’s irreverent and sarcastic and kind and generous. She’s accessible, and even sweet in a way you’d never guess from her fiction. I fell in love with her at that point.
When she showed up in my novel about a decade later, though, I was terrified. Her presence seemed to raise the stakes in every way. I had to depict her as believable--as a real person--which was daunting enough, but also just by writing a book about Flannery O’Connor, in which she’s one of the characters, I felt I was putting this huge pressure on myself, because there was just no way that book was allowed to be bad.
Paula McLain
I did a lot of research, of course. I started by reading everything I could get my hands on. I re-read Flannery’s stories, her essays and two novels. I read the one existing biography on her, and several critical essays about her work.
The real answer though is that it took me years to create "my Flannery". I was so scared to misrepresent her that I avoided going into her head for a long time. I thought that if I depicted her from a distance, I would be less likely to mess her up. Not shockingly, that was a limited path. It was only when I truly committed to her presence in the story that she came to life.
Paula McLain: Your descriptions of Milledgeville and Andalusia are utterly convincing. Did you visit those places as part of your research?
Ann Napolitano: Yes, I needed to. I was raised in New Jersey and live in New York. When it became clear that Flannery was part of the book, I flew to Atlanta, rented a car and drove to Milledgeville. I visited Andalusia, her farm (which is now a museum) and walked all over town. I was only there for about thirty hours, but that visit was crucial. Milledgeville had to be real to me, so I could make it real for the reader. Sitting on Flannery’s front porch, and smelling the air there--I don’t think I could have re-created her world without spending that time in her space.
Paula McLain: To Cookie Himmel, the sharpness of Flannery’s perception, which is "like a magnifying glass burning a hole through a sheet of paper," seems dangerous and terrifying. What is Cookie really afraid of?
Ann Napolitano: The real Flannery was obviously an unusually insightful person, with a talent for seeing through pretense and artifice, and this is what I tried to capture in her character. She has the ability to quickly see the truth about a person. Cookie knows (on some level, at least) that she has covered herself in artifice--she runs frivolous committees and has a marriage that looks wonderful only from the outside--and I think she’s terrified that Flannery will see that she is actually insecure and unhappy.
Paula McLain: How do you understand the mutual attraction between Flannery and Melvin Whiteson? Is the character of Melvin based on a real life figure in O’Connor’s life, or did you simply invent him?
Ann Napolitano: I invented him. Flannery was very lonely for long stretches, living on the farm with only her mother and her work, writing these weird, fantastic stories, and I was fascinated by the idea of normal life--friendship, relationships, love--intruding on her routine. Melvin is obviously drawn to this interesting woman, with her honesty and integrity, but I felt that Flannery could be similarly drawn to a "normal" man, to the idea of a normal life. She provokes Melvin and challenges his basic assumptions about life and he feels more alive in her presence. But I felt the flipside was at least as likely--that she would relish the company, the break from monotony, the freedom to leave the farm.
I learned afterwards that--in reality--Flannery befriended a young Danish textbook salesman called Erik Langkjaer; they went for walks and drives around Milledgeville. When he went back to Europe and got engaged, Flannery was reportedly upset. Not much is known beyond that. Anyone interested in Flannery’s life should reach Brad Gooch’s biography, which is great. Melvin wasn’t based on Erik at all, and I felt somewhat vindicated in my intuitions when I learned about this real life relationship.
Paula McLain: Flannery seems to have a difficult relationship with hope. When Regina pressures her to go on a pilgrimage to Lourdes and invite a miracle, Flannery’s characteristic cynicism slips away for the briefest moment, and she "feels the risk in her bones." How does her relationship with Melvin represent a similar risk?
Ann Napolitano: Flannery is fiercely unsentimental, and this is captured in the quote at the start of the book: "The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it." Just because you don’t like something doesn’t mean it ain’t so. And the flipside applies here: just because you like the idea of something doesn’t make it true. Flannery might like the idea of a romantic relationship with a handsome, wealthy man but her hooks are so bedded in reality that she doesn’t allow herself such idle fantasies.
However, I also wanted to explore the vulnerabilities of this strong, independent woman. She knows how to handle herself; she’s smarter than everyone else in the room; she’s been raised by an incredibly strong mother who literally does heavy labor on the farm. It must have been very difficult for Flannery to admit to lacking something, or needing something. (She actually wrote letters to friends from her deathbed that didn’t mention her illness.) What Melvin offers--the prospect of love, of a human connection--makes her feel inherently uncomfortable. She finds the connection with him very appealing, but she fundamentally distrusts it. It’s as if she’s constitutionally incapable of lying to herself, which is partly why I consider her so remarkable.
Paula McLain: At one point in the action, Flannery thinks about how violence seems to rise into her work naturally and of its own accord. She has simply learned to sit back and wait for trouble. Did you have an intuition that violence would crop up at some point in your novel, or did it surprise you?
Ann Napolitano: I could feel the story building towards something big--all the narrative strands seemed to be headed in a similar direction--but I didn’t know what that "something big" would be. When I got there, the violence felt both inevitable and surprising. I had only written relatively quiet stories until this point; it seems a little strange to say, but I was surprised to find that I had that kind of scene in me. It’s entirely likely that Flannery’s presence--and her facility with extraordinary violence--helped me to write these scenes.
Paula McLain: O’Connor once made a statement that she "felt a lack" in her life until instinct led her to peacocks. Why do you think Flannery felt admiration and awe for peacocks? You seem quite drawn to them as well, and use them both dramatically and symbolically in the novel. What do they represent for you?
Ann Napolitano: Everyone should read Flannery’s essay "The King of the Birds" (collected in Mystery and Manners) which is a great account of what she saw in these feathered beasts. It’s hard not to feel admiration and awe in the presence of a peacock’s fan--it’s an instant reminder that we live in a majestic world and that nature rules supreme. They also have this quality that Flannery and I both seem to admire--that peacocks don’t give a fig about the expectations of others. They do what they want to do, when they want to do it. You can wait all day for a peacock to show you his feathers; they’re not beholden to anyone. Flannery would laugh when people described them as "pets".
As to what they represent in the novel, I really don’t know what to say. I’m too close to the story; I don’t have the perspective. I didn’t write them to represent something, but that doesn’t mean they don’t. I look forward to hearing what other people think about the peacocks; I know the readers will be a lot wiser in this area than me.
Paula McLain: Your first novel, Within Arm’s Reach, is a family saga that, like A Good Hard Look has multiple narrators. Do you see other similarities between the two books?
Ann Napolitano: Creatively, I love going into different characters’ heads and looking at the same events through different pairs of eyes, and I certainly do that in both books. Beyond that, though, I don’t think so. Within Arm’s Reach contains elements of my family’s history, and A Good Hard Look has none. I feel like in order to sustain my interest (and sanity) for the years it takes to write a book, each story should be as different as possible from the last one.
Paula McLain: What’s next for you?
Ann Napolitano: I’ve started taking notes on a novel, which is a new experience for me. I’ve never tried to plot or plan before beginning a book, so I’m finding it to be an interesting (and frustrating, and hopefully rewarding) experience. The book is inspired by a news story I was obsessed with last year, but that’s all I can say about it at this point.
Photo of Anna Napolitano by Nicola Dove










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